Closing the Door on the Bahamas

Voices from the Editorial Collective

By Bill Fletcher, Jr.

It’s amazing the way that the news cycle operates. A story can emerge that has great significance. Then, poof, it vanishes. This just about summarizes a story that emerged in September in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian’s devastation of the Bahamas. The story is a simple one:  The Trump Administration denied Temporary Protective Status to victims of the hurricane.

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Jack O’Dell: A Renaissance Leftist

By Bill Fletcher, Jr. 

I met Jack O’Dell and his wife Jane Power shortly after moving to Washington, D.C. in 1990. I had heard of him over the years and read several pieces by him. Particularly in light of Jack’s role with the Rev. Jesse Jackson and the Rainbow Coalition, I was especially interested in knowing how he, as an open leftist, chose to navigate the terrain. What I was not anticipating, when I met Jack, was that it was the beginning of a friendship that would last until his final days. 

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Why Black Brazilians Voted for a Fascist

By James Early

What is it about the racial constitution of Brazil that poor people of African descent would, under any circumstances, vote for a fascist? 

A simple direct political question of why poor Brazilians of African descent would, under any circumstances, vote for a fascist invariably leads to extended discussion, debate and opinion. Facts and reliable statistical data do not readily yield hard answers nor automatic insight.

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Haiti: The Masses’ Struggle Against Corruption, Social Inequities and Imperialist Domination

By Jean Lesly René

During the last two months, Haiti has been embroiled in an intense period of political upheaval, pitting an increasing number of civil society’s sectors and political parties against President Jovenel Moise, the oligarchy and other ruling forces of this U.S.-dominated satellite state.

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 #FreeWestPapua; A Hidden Black Colony Struggles for Independence

By David A. Love

The Indonesian province of West Papua is, in reality, a colony, an occupied land whose indigenous people are regarded as monkeys because they are Black. This hidden colony, its land and people exploited, has been the victim of racial oppression and a slow-motion genocide that has claimed half a million lives over the course of five decades. The Melanesian people of West Papua continue to die, and their struggle for independence continues. 

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