Why W.E.B. Du Bois Matters 

By Charisse Burden-Stelly 

In 1950 at the age of 82, William Edward Burghardt Du Bois accepted the American Labor Party’s nomination to run for the New York seat of the U.S. Senate. Regarding this decision, his second wife, Shirley Graham, wrote: “The fact that you have done this now is conclusive proof of your own in[n]ate greatness. You accept the historic role in which events have cast you!” (Du Bois Papers, Shirley Graham Du Bois to W.E.B. Du Bois, Sept. 1, 1950).

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No to an Iran-U.S. War!

Voices from the Editorial Collective 

By Bill Fletcher, Jr. 

It is a matter of moral and political necessity that the planet’s progressive citizens speak out unambiguously against the U.S. aggression perpetrated against Iran and the danger of an Iran-U.S. war. The murder of Iranian Major General Qasem Soleimani was, at best, a reckless act by a desperate president, completely panicked about his impeachment. At worst, it was a declaration of war against a sovereign country which could lead to a much larger regional conflict.

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Fires, Missiles and Climate Change

By Nnimmo Bassey

Watching a video of a cyclist offering water to a koala on a highway in Australia, then helping it up a tree on the side of the highway was so touching. The animal turned around and waved back as the man turned to leave. Other photos of people helping scared animals have been posted on social media, and they all indicate the basic human instinct of love for all species, human and non-human.

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When the Python Sings

A Poem

By Nnimmo Bassey

1. Nigeria

If there is egwu eke
There must be a drummer
Or the flutist
Where there is a dance there must be a song
Who is the musician to whose beats
The python is dancing?

The crocodile please
My gapping jaws and fearsome teeth
Never mean I smile
No matter how hard my stinking efforts with
Dirt-crusted teeth
Who says the crocodile smiles or is this a search for flesh to rip?

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Panama Invasion +30

By Bill Fletcher, Jr.

December 20th marks the 30th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Panama. Dubbed “Operation Just Cause,” the stated aim of the invasion was to unseat and capture Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega. Noriega, a longtime operative for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, had become an embarrassment for the United States government in what was a moment of transition into a post-Cold War world. President George H.W. Bush decided to take steps.           

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What Happens When Africans Stop Owning Development?

By T. D. Harper-Shipman

African governments and societies that want equitable and ecologically-sound futures should stop owning development.

When I say that African governments and societies must stop owning development, there is a double-entendre here. What does it mean to own development? By “development,” I mean the contrived economic and political processes that are unfolding across the continent and the alterations they are making in African societies and eco-systems. 

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The Call of Jamestown

By Michael A. Gomez 

In late August 1619, some 20 Africans disembarked at Point Comfort, or what is now Fort Monroe in Hampton, Virginia. Having been seized by the White Lion, an English privateer (flying under the Dutch flag) from the São João Bautista, a Portuguese slave ship en route to Mexico from what is now Angola, they were joined days later by a second group of Africans. The second group was taken from the same Portuguese slaver, aboard the English pirate ship the Treasurer.

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